Resources for Virtual Music Programming

Resources for Virtual Music Programming

Category Virtual Programming IdeasAt Home Resources
Virtual Group Lessons (Zoom, etc)
Tutorial on how to set up virtual group lessons for any instrument 

Instrument Loaner Program
Resources (Recommended Equipment list and sample parent permission form) to help you set up an instrument Loaner Program.
Advanced
Berklee Pulse
Berklee Online

Beginner 
Yousician
• Curated Youtube Lessons (ie. Guitar, Ukulele, Piano, Drum pad, Vocals)
Virtual Beat making/recording sessions (via Zoom, etc)
Free beat making tutorials and examples of virtual music production projects/sessions 

Rhythm Roulette (Using Splice)
Challenge your participants to a weekly beat making challenge using predetermined samples
Advanced
Ableton (Free 30 day trial)
Beatmaker 3

Beginner 
BlocsWave
Garageband
• Virtual Group Lessons (Zoom, Skype, etc)
Tutorial on how to set up virtual group lessons or songwriting sessions for vocalists 

• Cover Song Challenge
Set up a weekly Cover Song competition to encourage virtual collaboration and music making.
Advanced & Beginner
TikTok
Acapella
• Zoom Concert Watch Party 
Schedule a regular time to meet up with participants to watch a virtual concert (using “screen share”) Examples: Beyoncé Homecoming, HipHop Evolution, or favorite artists on YouTube. 

Virtual Karaoke Party 
Tutorial on how to set up a virtual Karaoke party with your participants (complete with a Google Doc best practice
New York Vocal Coaching
Chrome Music Lab
Sampulator
You DJ

Music Making Resources

↓Category↓↓At Home Resources↓
• Ableton (Free 30 day trial) – Professional level beat making software
ProTools First – Free version of Industry standard software
• Bandlab (also has a phone App) – Collaborate on beats/tracks with friends 
Soundtrap – Collaborate on beats/tracks with friends 
IOS and Android compatible:
Zenbeats – Make beats with classic Roland Sounds like 808’s
BlocsWave – Loop-based app to explore, create and record your music
LaunchPad – Instantly create and remix music
Acapella – Connect, collaborate and create music with friends who love to sing and play instruments.

IOS only:
Beatmaker 3 – Professional DAW powered by a mobile device
Garageband – Turn your iPad, and iPhone into a collection of Touch Instruments and a full-featured recording studio
Reason Compact – Your pocket music studio
Reason Take – Record your ideas anywhere… just Sing, hum, rap, or strum.
“Drop a Beat” Apple App Story – Collection of other popular music making Apps for IOS

Android only:
Best Music Making Apps – Collection of other popular music making Apps for IOS
Mobile Permission – Send Permission Slips to Parents’ cell phones
Bloomz – The #1 App for All Your Classroom Communication
• Remind – Communication for the school, home, and everywhere in between.
Crew – The connected frontline workplace

Professional Development Resources

↓Category↓↓At Home Resources↓
Websites:
Music Impact Network – Free program resources for after school music programs
Groove3 – Pro-quality Recording studio video tutorials
Henny Tha Bizness – Professional iPad music Producer
• Genius Deconstructed – How to make a hit with the industry’s top producers
• Pensado’s Place “Into the Lair” – Engineering and Mixing Tutorials with Dave Pensado
Lyndia:
Music Production
Coursera:
Teaching Popular Music
Music Production
Skillshare:
Music Production
Video Production
EdX.org:
Music Technology
Music Theory
Creativity & Entrepreneurship
Berklee Online:
Free Resources

Creative Virtual Programming Ideas

Rubik’s Cube Beat

Check out this cool Rubik's Cube Beat put together by Will, our Music Clubhouse Coordinator. You can tap into your creative side at home too. For you it might look like creating your own beat, like Will did, or it could be drawing, writing, dancing, singing, playing an instrument, cooking or any other form of expression you choose. Let us know in the comments how you're tapping into your creative side.

Posted by West End House on Monday, March 30, 2020
Rubik’s Cube Beat
BGCD At Home Announces The Masked Singer!

BGCD At Home is excited to announce our very own version of The Masked Singer! Episodes will be posted on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 8pm on both our Facebook and YouTube pages. Members and families have 24 hours to vote/comment on who they think lost and the loser will need to reveal themselves the next day. See you for the premier tomorrow at 8pm! #WeAreDorchester

Posted by Boys & Girls Clubs of Dorchester on Monday, March 30, 2020
The Masked Singer Competition

Logic Remote as a Midi Control Surface

Turn an iPad into a digital control surface and make beats like a pro

Some participants can be intimidated by the recording studio equipment and process.  Empower them by using a tool they are comfortable – iPads and Logic Remote can be used as a control surface to make beats and help participants take control of the recording process.  Whether they’re using the transport to record themselves from within the vocal booth, using the iPad as a “second screen” to multitrack mix in the control room, or using the iPad to program drum beats and chord progressions, Logic Remote is a versatile way to make the recording process more accessible to everyone!

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How to… 

  • Download Logic Remote on iTunes App store (this is a Free App) 
  • Launch your Logic Session and pair Logic Remote to your computer (must be on the same network) 
    • FYI: Logic Remote also works with Garageband 
  • Use your iPad as a “second screen” or a “midi” control surface for your session using these helpful features (and more): 
    • Beat making/songwriting: 
      • Drum Pads – digital trigger pads are a tactile way for participants to program in their kick and snare tracks. It also has a “Kits” view which is more visual drum set
      • Note Repeat – perfect for creating authentic sounding trap music “sprinkler hi hats”
      • Chord Strips – Similar to “Smart Chords” in Garageband, this is an easy way to write chord progressions.  Participant can focus on quickly getting their ideas fleshed out without having to worrying about music theory 
      • Keyboard – copying the root motion of the Smart Chords progression, participants can easily add a bass line or synth layers. It also has “Fretboard” features if you prefer
    • Navigation and Mixing:
      • Key Commands – Frequently used recording functions like: Recording Transport, Save, New Track, Automation, etc
      • Mixer – great way to add a “second screen” that gives participants a tactile way to move digital faders during mixing/mastering
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Rhythm Roulette (Using Splice)

Introducing three random samples equals endless beat making creativity for your participants

Rhythm Roulette is a great way to get participants experimenting with making electronic music by getting over the initial hump that’s always the most challenging… “where do I start?!” Getting a project off the ground is always difficult, but being forced to build around a particular sample or sound can be a great springboard for creativity. There are lots of different ways to use the idea of a “Rhythm Roulette” in the studio, and they can be tailored to different ages and experience levels – below are just a few examples.  

In Addition… 

  • This program is based off of the Rhythm Roulette | Mass Appeal Youtube series. To understand how this program works, you have to first understand the rules of the Rhythm Roulette: #1 – Find a record store, #2 – Blind-fold producer, #3 – Pick 3 random records, #4 – Make a beat by sampling 

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How to… 

  • The basic concept is… Grab random samples or loops from sound libraries (like Splice or Apple loops) and help participants make a beat using all three samples. FYI: This is a great way to introduce and utilize a Splice Sounds account
  • For beginners: 
    • Grab a 4 bar instrumental loop (or chord progression) 
    • Each participant (and instructor/s) creates their own drum beat to go with the loop/progression 
      • Don’t let participants listen to each others tracks while they’re making them
      • Keep the activity short and sweet – have participants only build a 4 bar drum track
      • Encourage participants to experiment with elements such as: Drum kit libraries, Tempo/BPM, Dynamics, Mute/unmute, Panning, Effects, Layering, Etc. 
    • Everyone plays their track (over a PA speaker), listens and compares what they came up with
    • Discuss how different grooves and feels can make the same sample sound completely different.
      • For example: A loop with a 4-on-the-floor feel vs. a trap feel
  • For more advanced participants: 
    • Choose three random loops and/or samples (Splice or Apple Loops) 
    • Challenge participants to make a beat (in 30-60 minutes) that includes ALL three loops/samples
    • Introduce more advanced concepts like: 
      • Matching key signatures (Ie. show how some samples won’t work well together because they are in different keys or tonalities)
      • Tempo and beat matching 
      • Groove and feel (ie. Swing vs. straight) 
      • Dynamics
      • Effects and filters 
      • Classic drum sounds (ie. Acoustic, electronic, 808’s, lo-fi, etc) 
      • Etc. 
  • Variation for teens: 
    • For teens, before we make any beats, I show them the “I played a show using only the 1991 Casio Rapman” video from Adam Neely’s YouTube channel. This video introduces a topic that is relevant to the activity ie. how limitations can sometimes inspire creativity
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Music Producer Reward System

Participants earn studio privileges while improving their producing skills!

The Music Producer Reward System motivates participants to learn more in the studio by creating 3 levels of “Producers”. As participants advance, they learn studio software and techniques and “level-up” to earn additional studio privileges.

How to…

  • First, set up various levels of Music Production workstations and/or studios in your program space.
  • Participants start on the basic setup and “level-up” to more sophisticated studios as they learn more skills. For example:
    • “Studio A” – iMac or iPad Workstation equipped with Garageband (Headphone based)
    • “Studio B” – iMac Workstation with Logic and basic interface/mic setup (with speakers) located inside of a practice room
    • “Studio C” – Professional level project studio, complete with Logic/ProTools, Isolation booth, and your program’s most advanced recording studio equipment
  • Determine what skills participants must demonstrate in order to gain access to each studio. Print and display the requirements for each level of “producer” (Sample levels are provided below)
  • Create an incentive chart to visually track and help motivate participants’ achievements. Regularly post and update the names of each “Co-Producer”, “Producer” and “Executive Producer”

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Genius’ Deconstructed

Submitted by Mike Lembke www.bgcb.org

If you haven’t checked out any Genius Deconstructed videos yet – get on it! “The Making of Thank U, Next” is great to share with kids and helps us remember that making music is really about having fun and sharing an emotional connection with friends, artists, and fans!

Stay up to date with the latest music trends. Below is Genius’ Deconstructed series YouTube Playlist

Genius’ Deconstructed YouTube Playlist

Music Production for Large Groups

Got a big group for your studio – why not have them all contribute on a track?!

Sometimes you end up with 15 beginner participants in your studio and they all want to make a beat right now! Music Production for Large Groups gives you some tips on how to create a “patchwork quilt” music production project. This allows many different participants with different tastes, preferences, ideas and skills all to contribute to one big tapestry… your final track!  

In addition participants:

  • Learn basic music production and songwriting techniques
  • Learn collaboration while working towards an end goal
  • Are inspired to work on solo music production projects
  • Produce enough tracks to release an album

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How to…

  • Establish:
    • End goal/s (i.e. “Album Release” party and/or performance at end of the semester)
    • Session days and times. Meet with the group on a regular basis.
    • Participants who are interested in contributing (include as many as possible)
    • Themes or topics, decided upon as a group and influenced by the music mentors/staff
  • Participants collaboratively produce style/genre, samples, sounds, and beats
  • Break down the beat into smaller sections or individual elements for participants to perform/record
    • For example, to produce the drum track:
      • Participant “A” performs bass drum pattern on trigger pad
      • Participant “B” performs snare drum pattern
      • Participant “C” performs hi-hat pattern
      • Participant “D, E and F” record claps on 2 & 4
      • Etc…
    • Repeat this process for bass and chords
      • Participants layer single notes on guitar, bass, and/or piano
    • Involve different participants for each Verse, Chorus, and Bridge. Mentors continually keep the momentum going.
  • Add lyrics once beat is finalized
    • Download a rhyming dictionary App on iPads
    • Each participant writes lyrics to contribute to the project (i.e. 1 or 2 bars worth of lyrics)
    • Each participant performs their lyrics in the isolation booth right away. This gets them hooked, motivated, and involved.
  • Mix and finalize the track
    • Participants who don’t want to sing/perform can help with the final mix by editing and adding effects.
    • Participants can also get involved in creating album art, photo/video, etc., to help support the album’s creation.
  • Repeat this process until participants have produced several tracks
  • Rehearse and prepare for an album release party, and have all participants perform their original songs
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Collaborative Music Production Projects

Tips for getting participants to work together as a team to complete a music production.

Objective: Encourage collaboration between participants who have specific Music Production skills

  • Participants will strengthen their individual music production skills
  • Learning how to work as a group (with minimal mentor/staff involvement) towards an end goal
  • Collaborative led projects involving participants with specific music production skills including:
    • Beat maker/producer
    • Lyric writer
    • Singer/rapper
    • Instrumentalist
    • Technical/engineer
    • Graphic design and/or video production

To Learn More: 

Solo Artist Music Production Projects

Give participants a true “indie-label” experience by helping an up-and-coming artist complete an original album

Help guide an independent, solo artist through all aspects of a music production including songwriting, lyric writing, production, engineering, performance, and marketing/promoting their brand. These projects give independent and self-directed participants the freedom to produce an original album while having support from staff members along the way. 

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How to…

  • Create an invite only in-house “record label” for dedicated participants 
    • Solo artists are invited to be part of “record label” 
  • Meet with Solo Artist to discuss their project timeframes, goals and outcomes 
  • Artist is responsible for all songwriting, lyrics, production, content, ideas, artwork, etc.
    • Coach the artist on production process, needs, and goal setting
  • Recording sessions should be booked in advance and as needed
  • Support, support, support! And keep Solo Artist on task 
  • Help troubleshoot with music industry questions like:
    • Publishing album online 
    • Marketing/promotion on social media 
    • Booking performances
    • Etc.
  • Record a “commercially ready” original album and post for sale (iTunes, etc) 
  • Help artist book performance and market their album to friends, family and supporters 
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3 Quick Songwriting Activities

Three proven ways to get participants engaged in songwriting right away 

Songwriting and especially lyric writing can be a daunting experience especially if a participant has never done it before. The three examples below get participants writing original songs as quickly as possible using techniques used by professional songwriters. Participants will learn basic songwriting/lyric writing skills and techniques and work as a team to create original songs/lyrics and record/perform their own original songs!

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How to… 

A “blank canvas” can be intimidating for even the most experienced artist. The following examples have built-in “creative limitations” to help keep participants focused on completing the task at hand and sets them up for success. Keep your participants accountable to work within the boundaries of the writing activity or songwriting technique and watch how it helps drive participants’ creativity. 

Here are 3 examples of successful songwriting activities:

Example 1: “Just write” – Encourage participants to explore stream-of-consciousness lyric writing. 

  • Pick any topic (really ANY topic… e.g. “water bottle” was used once and worked great!)
  • For 5-10 minutes, participants write in a notebook (or on their phones) without stopping.
  • Encourage participants to go back through their notes and look for lines or words that jump out.
    • Help them look for metaphors or build a story behind the theme they chose.
  • Participants can then rewrite or continue to develop lyrics into a full song.

Example 2: “Scaffolding” – Create an original song using the song form and chord changes of another song.

  • Participants choose a song they like and are familiar with and analyze the song form and chords.
  • Participants choose a new theme/topic and write new lyrics to the verse, chorus, bridge, etc.
  • Participants then take their new lyrics and rewrite the melody of the song.
    • Optional: You can also choose a new chord progression, key, tempo, and/or whatever works
  • Record and/or perform!

Example 3: “Changing Perspective” – This activity places a participant/s in their peer’s shoes, encouraging empathy and shift in perspective and voice.

  • Divide participants into pairs.
  • Participants share a “small moment” experience from their day.
    • Optional: Pairs can pick a topic or theme so their lyrics are similar.
  • Loop a beat or chord progression (whatever feels right for the group).
  • Each individual writes lyrics about their partner’s experience (in first person).
  • Participants then add or change tempo/beat/melodies to adjust to the mood.
  • Participants can then rewrite or continue to develop lyrics into a full song.
  • Record and/or perform!
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